City Council Agenda & Alderman Notes: January 22, 3019

Meetings & Agendas, Opinion: City Council Agenda & Alderman Notes: January 22, 3019

Minot’s City Council will meet Tuesday, January 22, 2019 to consider the following agenda. Below you’ll find the full agenda along with the thoughts of one Alderman on each. And if you’re wondering about the cover image, there’s a related agenda item. Regular City Council Meeting Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 5:30 PM City Council Chambers – City Hall Any person needing special accommodation for the meeting is...

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Let’s be honest, there’s no such thing as a free bag

Commentary: Let’s be honest, there’s no such thing as a free bag

If you weren’t aware, a group of passionate Minot citizens appealed to Minot’s City Council to take up the issue of single-use plastic — particularly disposable plastic bags. After months of information gathering and taking public comment, the group offered several recommendations intended to curb consumption. One of the primary recommendations is a 10-cent tax on plastic bags. The theory with a tax is that it will reduce use...

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MSU student life and contributions and entrepreneurship and innovation in the energy sector

Commentary: MSU student life and contributions and entrepreneurship and innovation in the energy sector

GoodTalk Minot is a weekly collaboration between myself and Jonah Lantto of The Good Talk Network. Our focus: Minot and the people that make it interesting and keep it moving. This past week’s conversations featured the President of Minot State Student Government, Aaron Richard, and one of the founders of the region’s fastest-growing energy sector service companies, Kevin Black of Creedence Energy Services. Find and follow the #GoodTalk...

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Bismarck’s downtown market analysis to identify business gaps is a call to action for Minot

Commentary, News: Bismarck’s downtown market analysis to identify business gaps is a call to action for Minot

Over the past year, Minot’s been host to a ton of conversation about downtown. Both the future of the area and its role as a part of our larger economic engine feature significantly in the City’s International Economic Development Council report delivered last summer. Applecart-upsetting, table-turning, they’re both adjectives that could be used to describe the some of the recommendations in the IEDC report. Taking those recommendations to...

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Let’s be proud of this, and let’s call it The Igloo!

Commentary: Let’s be proud of this, and let’s call it The Igloo!

It’s back for its second season. Gaze North across the valley, and you’ll notice it; it’s the giant white marshmallow-like structure near the college. We call it the Air Supported Dome — it’s an accurate if not particularly catchy name. And from my perspective, it’s hard to imagine the community getting better bang for our local dollar in seeing it realized. I bring up the ‘bang for buck’...

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City Council Agendas and One Alderman’s Comments

News, Opinion: City Council Agendas and One Alderman’s Comments

The City of Minot City Council Committee of the Whole will meet Tuesday and Wednesday at 4:15 at City Hall to consider items on the agendas below.  Below you’ll find full agenda items along with links to staff-provided supporting documents. In red, you have the chance to take a peak inside the thinking of one Alderman. City of Minot City Council and Committee meetings are streamed live on...

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Details on Deer Season

Commentary, News: Details on Deer Season

While North Dakota’s 2018 deer gun season continues through Nov. 25, it still generates a fair amount of questions and conversation preseason, midseason and postseason. First off, this year’s deer hunting season did open later than what a lot of people think is normal. The traditional deer opener for more than three decades has been the Friday before Nov. 11. That means the range for the deer opener,...

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My Year Below Average Part III

Opinion: My Year Below Average Part III

Recap: I dared myself to see if we could keep our home energy consumption below an average of 500 kwh for an entire year.  Our house was pretty well-designed for a project like this, and the first few months turned out to be pretty easy.  When we finally crunched the numbers in the early part of September, I was a little worried that we would not hit our...

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My Year Below Average Part II

Opinion: My Year Below Average Part II

Let’s take a moment to recap in case you missed the last column: I am pretty average.  I was bored and felt inspired to do something to combat global climate change and I found a whole bunch of cool stats about home energy consumption by state on a website call EnergyLocal.  I set a goal of keeping our home’s average electricity consumption below 500 kwh per month aiming...

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My Year Below Average Part I

Opinion: My Year Below Average Part I

I would say that I am a pretty average person.  The two exceptions might be my intense love of Star Trek and my strong inability to bowl above a 180.  (I fully accept that those two things might be correlated…) This last year I set out on a quest to be decidedly below average in one particular category – home energy use. How did this topic and goal...

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Commentary: Are capricious state regulators contributing to ND’s child care shortage?

Childcare is and has been a continuing challenge in our communities. From a labor perspective, we’ve got a shortage of workers, and one key to entering the workforce is having confidence in where we leave our kids. In this commentary in the Grand Forks Herald, Rob Port argues that the State’s licensing and regulatory agency for childcare providers is setting arbitrary standards that are bottlenecking access to childcare...  summary by: Josh Wolsky

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Commentary: How America Will Turn Itself Around?

While a growing minority of us pick which side of the line (on any given issue) to stand on, there’s another group of people losing trust in all of it. Perhaps instead of choosing sides and, thus, who to distrust, we start listening to those who are watching our larger trends? What they’re seeing is a renaissance in civic revival. If you want to hear more, listen here.  summary by: Josh Wolsky

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